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Cucumber reporting in

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About Cucumber

Cucumber is now integrated in MarkUs’ trunk. Hurray!

I greatly encourage you to try it, it’s pretty simple. First, update to the last revision (just like you do every morning before breakfast, right?) and then visit the wiki page. After reading the requirements and running the tests sections you’re ready for a test run.

I’ll make sure to update the wiki/post/code with any feedback you provide.

About Acceptance Tests

Here are some guidelines to keep in mind when you write acceptance tests.

Speak the Client’s Language

Acceptance test are directed at the client. This is why they should speak your mother tongue and use domain specific language. There should be no reference to the code and it should conceptually stay at the user level.

You Don’t Have to Test Everything

You probably know by now that it’s impossible to test everything. But unlike when you write a unit or a functional test, which you want to be as thorough as you can, an acceptance test aims at asserting that a particular feature is actually there. So, most of the time, one case per features’ functionality is enough. Also, you don’t want to try for error cases. It’s just not the place, unless it is explicitly requested by the client, error case tests belongs to unit/functional tests.

An acceptance test output should not get convoluted with tons of specific border-line test cases. The output should be just what is needed for the client to assert that all of his requested functionalities are implemented and that they do work. That is, give the client some insight on whether or not he should accept the software.

References

Written by gabrielrl

December 4th, 2009 at 4:41 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

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